Blakely Memorial

Joseph E. Anderson
Captain Carelli 
Jesse Bentley
Curtis Bird
Brian Boldt
Terry Braswell
Ronnie Brown
Richard Carrique
Robert Cash
John Connoly
Richard Clayton
Jeff Collard
Robert Cool
Walker Dent
Gerald Ester
Fred Fitzgerald
Calvin Grant
Al Grimes
John Hall
"Johnny Reb" Lowe
Richard Magdeleno
Bill Meeks
Norm Pattarozzi
Harry Reamer
 
Norm Pattarozzi

Captain Norman Joseph Pattarozzi was a great skipper that was thought of as the best skipper ever had by his entire crew. He fought his cancer hard in his final days, but in the end, died peacefully at home surrounded by his family.


Norman was Captain of the Blakely November 1979 until November 1981. He was beloved and respected by his crew. "Stormin Norman" as he was affectionatly known really knew how get your attention, and his fatherly advice helped many a sailor out. He took great care of his men!

 
Captain Francis Carelli

From Francis Carelli (cousin of Capt. Carelli) via Mark Osborne: 
Blakely's Commissioning C.O.: Captain Carelli's hometown was Worcester, where his cousin presently resides.
Captain Carelli passed away about eight years ago ('93), from lung cancer. He was respected AND adored by his crew of plank owners and all that served with him on the Blakely. It's sad that he passed away from lung cancer, especially because he never smoked.       


Jesse "Monty" Bentley

From Mark Osborne:
He was a tall thin Southern drink of water that was a damn fine Sonar Sup and sailor. His wit and tall tales kept everyone laughing during those passive sonar watches. He died sadly in a motorcycle accident leaving two daughters ages 5 and 6.  


Curtis Bird
Curtis passed away from cancer after a very long battle on Saturday, July 21, 2001.

From Ralph Strunk:
I relieved Curtis of his duties as the Command Career Counselor in Jan. '88 so that he could do his full time job as "R" Division LCPO. My heart goes out to his family.  Curtis was one of Blakely's best; they won two Golden Anchor Awards for retention while he was the Command Career Counselor.  My heart goes out to his family. -Ralph  


Brian Boldt
Brian came to the Blakely as a young ASROC Gunners Mate fresh out of "A" School. He was an asset to his division and those that worked with him thoroughly enjoyed his company, particularly on liberty. Brian's life was cut short right after he separated from the navy when he was killed in a motorcycle accident.  

Terry Braswell

Terry Braswell

Terry was a Gunners Mate when he left the Blakely.  His faded uniforms and southern accent were his trademarks, he was always cutting-up and making people laugh.  I remember laying in my rack for a nooner and hearing Terry telling either Hooks or Vandergrift he was sick and couldn't work.  As soon as they left the berthing area I heard Terry laughing his ass off.  Terry died in Alabama in an automobile accident one week after getting out of the Navy.  I remember how quiet the ship was the day that when we found out about his death.  


Ronnie Brown

Ronnie died in automobile accident while traveling to his home for weekend liberty while the the Blakely was stationed in the Boston Shipyards.  


Richard Carrique

Richard brought his New York culture to redneckville. He had a whole new vocabulary when he left. Richard was a Sonar Tech aboard the Blakely. He left in February of 1980 for further schooling. Richard died around 1985 of an extended illness.  


Robert Cash

EN1 Robert Cash checked on board the Blakely in 1972.  He was preparing to retire in 1975.  But that plan was cut short by a chicken-shit hit-and-run driver while he was walking to the ship.  


Richard Clayton

Richard was a Gunners Mate Second Class and was said to be one of Bill Cordele finest. Richard died in a vehicle accident on his way home from duty aboard the Blakely.  

Jeff Collard

Jeffery Collard

Jeff was a Machinist Mate on the Blakely in the late '70s. He died in an automobile accident shortly after being discharged from the Navy.   


Walker Dent

Walker also passed on after retiring in Charleston, South Carolina.    


Fred Fitzgerald

Fred retired from the Navy a BTCM. He never received his first retirement check before losing his battle with cancer. He was living in Charleston, South Carolina when he died.

From BTCM Richard "Ozzie" Osburn: 
I served with Fred for about three years on the Blakely and, even though nearly twenty-five years have passed, I still remember him.  

I remember he was from Anderson, SC, and, more importantly, I remember him as a man who was an asset to the Navy and someone who could be depended on. Fred was one of that rare breed of sailor who led by example.  There was no need for him to shout at or intimidate the men of the fire-room in order to inspire them.  His friendliness and professional approach to his career was all that was needed to encourage them to do their best in whatever was asked. He crawled into the deepest and darkest reaches of the fire-room to inspect and repair machinery.  It didn't matter if it was down in the bilge, or in steam drums and mud drums, boiler casings or up the stack.  He was always there, getting just as sooty and oil smeared as the lowest ranking member of the crew.  His willingness to do whatever was necessary to keep the plant steaming was enough to inspire the other men to follow his example.  When we conducted at-sea exercises and an extra effort was required from the men, Fred was the one I turned to because I knew they would go the extra mile for him.  

Fred was once called - when he was a 1st class BT - as a character witness at a Courts Martial for one of our 3rd class BTs.  I don't know what Fred said in his testimony but the officers of the court must have respected his opinion concerning the Petty Officer and his offense because he was awarded only restriction and loss of one stripe.  That then-young sailor owes Fred a big debt of gratitude because his punishment could have been as severe as a BCD and brig time.   


Calvin Grant

Calvin "The General" Grant came to us from rural Albany, Georgia. He touched many lives on our ship with his gigantic heart and his friendliness for everybody. He will always be remembered for his high spirited nature and his big happy smile."   


John Hall  

John was a Yeoman aboard the Blakely. John died in a vehicle accident.  


Richard Magdeleno

Richard who was one of the most squared away sailors on the Blakely. He died in a automobile accident in 1983.  

   ET1 Gerald R. Ester

ET1 Gerald R. Ester worked in the ET shop on the Blakely. He also served on the USS Randolph and Belatrix. He enjoyed his years in the Navy and the various ports that he visited through the years. He passed away on August 29, 1998.
  

Bill Meeks


William H Meeks Jr. Died December 16, 2002 of cancer. He was a retired Command Master Chief Petty Officer.



"Johnny Reb" Lowe
 




"Harry Reamer
 

Harry Reamer was a GMGCS. He was a local hero in Charleston for saving the life of a pregnant women when he pulled her from her burning and overturned Volkswagon.

Harry retired after twenty two years of active service and returned to Indiana where he served proudly as a US Postal Delivery man, until his death in September 21, 1997 when he succumbed to colon cancer.


"John Connoly
John Connoly

 

John passed away 21 June 2004.


"Al Grimes
John Connoly

 


Alan K Grimes STGCS(SW) Retired passed away at the age of 54 from lung fibrosis.

Al left a bevy of friends behind as well as his wife Coleen, son Christopher and Daughter Jennifer.

He loved Blakely and he took good care of his troops. He left the ship as a First Class but made Chief soon after leaving. He served on other ships and commands but Blakely was his favorite.

 



"Robert Cool
John Connoly

 

With deepest regret I alert you all to the passing of BT3 Robert Cool, B division 1972-1976 on 24 June 2009. (He was 56 years old)

I first met Bob when I was delivered by helicopter to the fan tail during  vertical replenishment in the Tonkin Gulf.  It was the start of a friendship that would last until just after my seperation in October 1974. 

 

 

He, was a close friend during that time and the memories of that have stayed with me over the years.  According to his obituary Bob left the Navy and relocated to Bonneau,SC from Wilkes Barre,PA.. 

He retired as a supervisor with the Public Works Utilities.  His obituary said Bob was an outdoorsman.  Having spent many a night in a boat with him, a Coleman lantern cans of vienna sausages, baked beans and Old Milwakee beer, I can attest to that!  His nick name was Easy and it fit him.  A very hard worker with a even temperment, may he rest in peace.




joe

Joseph E. Anderson EWC, was on the Blakely from 85-89. He was an exceptional sailor who took his duties of Electronic Warfare very serious. During that period of time, our ship was very prepared for battle, due to shipmates like Joe. He was also a lot of fun to hang out with, very witty and versed in a wide variety of subjects. His humor and good nature will be missed. His ex-wife Becky told me he is buried at Arlington National Cemetery. Joseph E. Anderson, 52, passed away Nov. 5, 2009. He was born May 20, 1957 in Mobile, AL. He retired from the U.S. Navy. A memorial service was held at 10:00 a.m., Thursday, Nov. 12, 2009 at HARDAGE-GIDDENS FUNERAL HOME, 1701 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville Beach (904) 249-2374.

 


USS Blakely Home Page